PANCHO GRAELLS - <i> Femme dans l'eau</i>
Femme dans l'eau
Signed lower left
Acrylic on canvas: 120 x 60 cm
Painted in 2012
PANCHO GRAELLS - "IV Untitled"
"IV Untitled"
Painted in 2011
Signed lower right
Acrylic on canvas: 89 x 116 cm

PANCHO GRAELLS - <i> Contorsion </i>
Contorsion
Acrylic on canvas: 100 x 50 cm
Painted in 2011

GRAELLS PANCHO (Caracas 1944)

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PANCHO GRAELLS was born in Caracas, Venezuela in 1944. He moved in 1951 with his family to Montevideo, Uruguay where he lived until 1973. At the age of 16, he took up painting and in 1967, he visited the studio of Augusto Torres, elder son of Joaquin Torres-Garcia. Graells met thru this encounter the painter Luis Montes from whom he took drawing lessons for months.
He broke off his studies to go and work for the press and at the age of 24 his initial caricatures were published in the weekly newspaper Marcha, Extra, De Frente, Ahora and the weekly satirical publication La Balota.
In 1973, during political unrest Graells fled to Argentina (1973-1975) where he worked for the newspaper Noticias and the 2 magazines Crisis and Satiricon. In 1975, Graells returned to Venezuela (1975-1983) where, for several years, he was in charge of the international political cartoon in the newspaper El Nacional and at the same time he started to paint again.
In 1980, Graells met for the first time the Uruguayan painter and sculptor Julio Alpuy, one of the most accomplished and respected artists to come out of Latin America's School of the South, who was a direct disciple of the Uruguayan master Joaquin Torres-Garcia at his workshop, El Taller Torres-Garcia. This friendship was a major influence on his artistic carrier.
In 1983, Pancho Graells moved to Paris where he worked for daily newspaper Le Monde, Le Monde Diplomatique, Le Monde de la Musique, The Herald Tribune, the literary magazine Lire and Le Canard Enchaîné. During all this time, he maintained his friendship with Julio Alpuy until the year before his death in April 2008.

Exhibition La Maison de l'Amérique Latine in Paris 2009

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